NTOG FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to be in the Navy already to join NTOG, or can I apply directly at a Canadian Armed Forces Recruiting Centre?

Potential NTOG candidates must be currently serving members of the Royal Canadian Navy or the Royal Canadian Naval Reserve.

I am a currently serving Navy member. What requirements must I meet in order to apply to NTOG?

Candidates from all Navy occupations and trades may apply, and at a minimum must have achieved their Operationally Functional Point (occurs when a military member completes all the qualifications required for first employment in his or her assigned military occupation). Additionally, it is recommended that applicants have the following minimum standards for fitness and medical status:

  • Be able to achieve a minimum level of Gold on the FORCE fitness test;
  • Consistently achieve Level 2 of the Army Fitness Manual; and
  • Have a minimum medical category of 32225. Within the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), a medical category is a numeric profile assigned to each CAF member that summarizes key information about his or her employability and deployability within the member’s occupation.

Currently serving Navy personnel can contact their career managers for additional details.

How long is the training?

To begin, all candidates must undergo the five-day selection process at the NTOG Assessment Centre, with officers required to complete an additional two days. Selection is conducted at NTOG’s Albert Head Training Facility, which is part of CFB Esquimalt and is located in Metchosin, B.C.

Competitive candidates are then selected to complete the five-and-a-half month Naval Tactical Operator Course conducted at the training facility. If successful, further specialized training will be conducted at the unit level, as required.

I am a currently serving member of the Royal Canadian Navy or Royal Canadian Naval Reserve. Who can I contact to apply to be a member of NTOG?

If you would like to apply to become a member of NTOG, contact your Career Manager or local Canadian Armed Forces Recruiting Centre.

Is NTOG considered a special operations force?

No, NTOG is not a special operations force, although members of NTOG do have additional specialized training. The unit is designated, however, to be capable of working with the Canadian Special Operations Forces Command.

Has NTOG worked with other nations’ maritime forces?

During operations as well as training and capacity building exercises, NTOG has worked with numerous naval forces, special forces, and specialized police and coast guard services of many allied and partner nations. Some of these nations include, but are not limited to: the United States, Mexico, Tunisia, Jamaica, Spain, Cote D’Ivoire, Liberia, Ghana, Gabon, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Trinidad and Tobago, Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, France, Morocco, Fiji, Greece, Japan, South Korea, and Ukraine.