Rear-Admiral William Moss LANDYMORE, OBE, CD

Rear-Admiral William Moss LANDYMORE, OBE, CD

Rear-Admiral William Moss LANDYMORE, OBE, CD

Rear-Admiral Landymore joined the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) as a Cadet in 1934.  From 1934 until 1940 he conducted his training with the Royal Navy (RN) in HM Ships Frobisher, Emerald, Glasgow, Victory and Windsor, and then returned to Canada in 1940 serving in HMC Ships Fraser and Margaree.  In 1942 he specialized in gunnery, attending the RN Long Gunnery course at HMS Excellent, followed by an appointment in 1943 to HMS Grenville, and then in 1944 to Naval Service Headquarters (NSHQ) in Ottawa, as Director of Warfare and Training.  In 1944, he returned to sea in the cruiser HMCS Uganda and in 1945 returned to NSHQ first as Staff Gunnery Officer, followed in 1946 by an appointment as Deputy Director of Weapons and Tactics.  In 1948 he attended the RN Staff Course, followed in 1949 by the RN Tactical Course and Joint Services Staff Course.  In 1949 he was promoted to Commander, and in 1950 was appointed Director of Manning and Personnel Statistics at NSHQ.  In 1951 he assumed command of the destroyer HMCS Iroquois for Korean War service, and later was appointed Commander Canadian Destroyers Far East.  Promoted to Captain in 1953, he attended the Imperial Defence College in Britain, followed in 1955 by an appointment to NSHQ as Director Naval Plans and Operations, and in 1957 to the staff of the NSHQ Legal Officer.  In 1958 he assumed command of the aircraft carrier HMCS Bonaventure.  On promotion to Commodore in 1959, he was appointed Chief of Staff to Flag Officer Atlantic Coast (FOAC) and then Senior Canadian Officer Afloat Atlantic in 1962.  Upon promotion to his current rank in 1962, Rear-Admiral Landymore was appointed Flag Officer Pacific Coast (FOPC) in Esquimalt BC, and in 1964 Flag Officer Atlantic Coast in Halifax NS. 

In January 1966 he was appointed as the first Commander Maritime Command, in which position he served until he was encouraged to take an early retirement in July 1966, after a disagreement with the Minister of National Defence over the continuation of the traditional naval identity.  He died 27 November 2008.